How to fix up a home before putting it on the market


If you’re handy and have good DIY skills, you can undertake many of the small jobs around the house yourself, bringing it to peak condition and ready for sale. If not, you can hire a local handyman to help you.


Walk through the house with a notepad and create a list of all of the areas which need improvement.


Among the areas you should examine are:

  • Front fence - Is it in good condition? Does it need vines pulled away, a paint job or repairs?

  • Front lawn - Is it lush and tidy?

  • Pathway - Are there cracks that need to be fixed? Would paving paint give it a nice facelift?

  • Front door  -Is a new door required, or does it need to be painted?

  • Windows - Are they clean and do the surrounds need filling or painting?

  • Facade - Does it need to be pressure-washed or repainted?

  • Interior walls - Are they all looking pristine or freshly painted in neutral tones?

  • Architraves - Are they chipped, dented, or need new paintwork?

  • Flooring - Are the carpets clean and in good condition? Are there floorboards underneath which can be polished?

  • Kitchen - Are the cabinets in good condition? Would painting them improve and modernise the space? Would replacing the benchtop make it look contemporary? Does the splashback need to be replaced?

  • Bathrooms - Are the tiles in good shape? Does the grouting need to be cleaned or replaced? If the tiles are dated, would they be better painted with tile paint?

  • Laundry - Is there ample storage and useful counter space?

  • Back yard - Are the plants trimmed and garden beds weeded? Would planting some flowers and pots of colour add some wow factor?

  • Pool - Is it clean, properly fenced and surrounding areas furnished with an inviting setting?

These are some of the areas to consider revamping to create a positive impression of a well looked after house. Talk to your agent about any areas needing improvement, but make sure you don’t overcapitalise.


This article was originally published by domain.com.au written by Daniel Butkovich